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Reading: Lois Rosen at Barrel & Keg in #SalemOR – Thurs. Oct. 5th

Lois Rosen reading prose and poetry

Thursday, October 5, 2017 at 7:00 PM51AXUGGjbUL

Barrel & Keg Wine Bar

Salem poet and fiction writer Lois Rosen has published two poetry books, Nice and Loud (Tebot Bach) and Pigeons (Traprock Books).

A founder of Salem’s Peregrine Writers, she leads the Trillium Writers and Willamette University’s ICL Writers.

Lois’ current novel-in-progress takes place in Italy, Portland, and Mint, Oregon.

Featured reader begins at 7:00 and the open mic will directly follow.

Our hosts, The Barrel & Keg, feature a wide variety of beverages and the food pod in the back has a rotating menu of options for dinner!

We will have the area in back reserved. Just park in back or across the street and walk through the front door.

Free!

Salem Poetry Project on Facebook

Barrel & Keg Wine Bar (across from Salem Cinema)
1190 Broadway St NE (and Market)
Salem OR

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Live Music: Rich McCloud at Victory Club in #SalemOR – TONIGHT!

Rich McCloud performs at Victory Club – Tonight!

Saturday, September 2, 2017 | 9:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Victory Club | In the alley downtown (behind Reed Opera House)

One of Salem’s best musicians, Rich McCloud, rocks the alley at Victory Club in downtown Salem.

Location:

Victory Club

155 Liberty St NE Suite 120

Salem, OR 97301

History in the News: Earthquakes, Eclipses, Tsunamis, and Volcanoes: Can History Prepare us for the Unexpected? In #SalemOR – Aug. 17th

History in the News: Earthquakes, Eclipses, Tsunamis, and Volcanoes: Can History Prepare us for the Unexpected?

Thursday, August 17, 2017 | 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM

Willamette Heritage Center | Dye House

Social media experts forecast that the total solar eclipse of August 21 will be “the most photographed, most shared, most tweeted event in human history,” while highway authorities predict that the days surrounding the eclipse could see the greatest temporary mass migration of humans to see a natural event in U.S. history.

Oregonians are steeling themselves for the arrival of perhaps a million visitors, and attendant stresses on highway, sanitation, and cell phone systems; the Governor has even called out the National Guard in advance to handle crowds, traffic, and fires.

Panelists:

  • Christine Colasurdo: Artist, poet, and writer, author of Return to Spirit Lake: Life and Landscapes at Mt. St. Helens (2016) and contributor to In the Blast Zone: Catastrophe and Renewal on Mt. St. Helens (2008).
  • Jay Pasachoff: Astronomer and Williams College Professor, and Chair of the International Astronomical Union’s Working Group on Eclipses and a veteran of 65 previous solar eclipses, who is also leading an observational team on the Willamette campus for the eclipse.
  • Jason Younker: Anthropologist, Assistant Vice President and Advisor to the President on Sovereignty and Government to Government Relations at the University of Oregon, whose scholarship includes work on Coquille oral histories of tsunamis.

This History in the News panel considers the eclipse and other monumental natural phenomena such as volcanoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis, in social and historical perspective.

How did people in our region anticipate and respond to such cataclysmic or cosmic events in the past?  Did such events have long term effects on lives and landscapes here?

How have they been incorporated into the cultural memories and historical narratives of diverse communities?  Does history offer us lessons on how to predict, and prepare for such occurrences?

History in the News is FREE and open to the public.

Moderated by Dr. Leslie Dunlap, History Department, American Ethnic Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies Programs

Location Information:
Willamette Heritage Center (Off Campus)
1313 Mill Street SE
Salem OR 97301

Contact Information:
Name: Leslie Dunlap
Email: ldunlap@willamette.edu
Admission / Ticket Info:
Free and Open to the public

Event Sponsor(s):
Willamette University History Department

Other Details:
Food and Beverage for sale provided by Taproot Café


Third Thursday of each month, March through November | 5:30 pm to 7:00 pm

March 16th, April 20th, May 18th, June 15th, July 20th, August 17th, September 21st, October 19th, and November 16th, 2017

Discuss current events in historical context at a monthly roundtable with Mid-Valley historians, political scientists, and other intellectuals. The topic of each discussion will be pulled straight from the headlines, and will be decided just 10 days before each event. Listen to the thoughts of experts, then join in the conversation and voice your own opinions.

This program was made possible in part by a grant from Oregon Humanities(OH), a statewide nonprofit organization and an independent affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, which funds OH’s grant program. History in the News is sponsored by KMUZ Community Radio, and in partnership with Salem City Club.

History in the News at Willamette Heritage Center – Thurs., June 15th

“Real Histories of ‘Fake’ News:

The Politics of Journalism in Oregon’s Past”

Thursday, June 15 at 5:30 PM

Willamette Heritage Center | Dye House

The roundtable:

  • Barbara Mahoney, author of The Salem Clique: Oregon’s Founding Brothers (http://osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/salem-clique)
  • Dick Hughes, founder and principle of Hughesisms LLC and long-time reporter, columnist, and editor at the Statesman Journal
  • Seth Cotlar, professor of history at Willamette University.

For more information on these speakers and the program, see the History in the News webpage (https://www.willametteheritage.org/history-in-the-news/) or our Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1109135295897953/

Hope to see you Thursday in the WHC’s Dye House from 5:30-7pm.

Our friends from Taproot Lounge & Café will have delicious food and beverage available for purchase.

The program is free and open to the public.

ECOFEST – Part for the Planet in #SalemOR – Sat., June 17th

eco-fest-card-text-only

EcoFest is a family-friendly, educational outdoor festival hosted by the Straub Environmental Center in partnership with the City of Salem slated for June 17, 2017 at Riverfront Park.

EcoFest will feature:

  • a showcase of businesses offering earth-friendly products and services;
  • hands-on educational displays and activities provided by local non-profit organizations;
  • nature walks;
  • a “Green Energy Area” highlighting renewable energy and alternative-fueled cars;
  • a rock climbing wall and obstacle relay course for kids;
  • yoga classes;
  • music;
  • educational performances;
  • local food carts; and,
  • craft beers and wine!

more information…

History in the News at Willamette Heritage Center in #SalemOR – May 18th

True-Sons-of-Freedom-Library-of-CongressHistory in the News Presents:

Citizenship and Civil Liberties on the World War I Home Front

Thursday, May 18th • 5:30 pm to 7:00 pm

at the Willamette Heritage Center

May’s History in the News program is presented in partnership with the Oregon Historical Society and features a presentation by and discussion with Dr. Adriane Lentz-Smith, Dr. Kimberly Jensen, and Dr. Steve Sabol.

Americans fought their wars for democracy at home as well as abroad. Wartime propaganda and policies defined new rules for the status and practice of citizenship in Oregon and across the nation. Women activists, for example, claimed a more complete female citizenship. For women of color and women in ethnic communities, this push intersected with claims and contestations rooted in their racial and ethnic identities and pushed back against a system of white racism that seemed destined and determined to expand. Native Americans, African Americans, immigrants, and hosts of others all engaged in war-related debates and activism that furthered their ongoing claims to civic rights and obligations. Some saw the promise of citizenship through wartime loyalty in support of government programs and the war effort. Others claimed a citizen’s right to dissent, often paying a high price to do so. This panel will provide audiences an overview of these histories and create opportunity for discussion about their ongoing legacies today.

Kimberly Jensen is Professor of History and Gender Studies at Western Oregon University. She is the author of Mobilizing Minerva: American Women in the First World War (2008) and is completing a book project “Civic Borderlands: Oregon Women, Citizenship, Civil Liberties and the Surveillance State, 1913-1925.”

Adriane Lentz-Smith is Associate Professor of History, Women’s Studies, and African & African-American Studies at Duke University. A historian of the black freedom struggle and the United States in the World, she is the author of Freedom Struggles: African Americans and World War I. She is currently working on a new book project on African Americans and state violence in the post-civil-rights years.

Steven Sabol is Associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.  His forthcoming book, “The Touch of Civilization”: Comparing American and Russian Internal Colonization, is scheduled to be published by the University Press of Colorado in February 2017. In addition, he is co-editing North Carolina During the First World War, forthcoming in late 2017 with the University of Tennessee Press.  He is the former editor of two different scholarly journals, Nationalities Papers and First World War Studies.

History in the News is FREE and open to the public!

Food and drink will be available for purchase from Taproot Lounge & Cafe.

Join us for History in the News on the third Thursday of each month through November.

History in the News is presented in part by a grant from Oregon Humanities and is sponsored by KMUZ Community Radio with the support of our communications partner, Salem City Club.

History in the News: Crowds and Controversies in Oregon’s Parks and Wilderness – at Willamette Heritage Center in #SalemOR – Thurs. April 20th

HxNews April 2017 Postcard

Crowds and Controversies in Oregon’s Parks and Wilderness

Thursday, April 20th | 5:30 pm to 7:00 pm

Willamette Heritage Center

Oregon’s parks, campgrounds, and wilderness areas are less tranquil than we might imagine. Heavy use of such areas has produced questions and controversies about new regulations at Opal Creek, overcrowding at Crater Lake, and increased fees at state parks. Public lands attract controversies in other ways, from the “rogue” National Parks twitter account resisting efforts to reduce National Parks Service funding to the 2016 militant takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. This History in the News program will explore the political, cultural, and social history of controversies and debates in and about Oregon’s spectacular natural public spaces.

History in the News is FREE and open to the public.

Food and drink will be available for purchase from Taproot Lounge & Café.

This series is presented in part by a grant from Oregon Humanities, with the sponsorship of KMUZ Community Radio, and with our communications partner Salem City Club.

Contact Info:
Willamette Heritage Center, Suite 200
1313 Mill Street SE
Salem, OR 97301