Willamette heritage center in #salemor presents Zooming Back to History: “When History Collides with the Present: Tales from the 21st Century Classroom” – tues. Feb. 9th

Willamette Heritage Center Presents:

Zooming Back to History

An Online History Speaker Series

This series, a fundraiser for the Willamette Heritage Center, is brought to you by our generous presenting sponsor Oregon State Capitol Foundation. This public online gathering seeks to share historical perspectives of topics related to the Mid-Willamette Valley and beyond.

Starting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday night (date below), each speaker will talk about their topic for approximately 30 minutes at which point we will ask participants to submit questions regarding the topic.

Payment options will be available online below – $10/speaker or $30/series. The link and password for each speaker will be sent to you via email.

Ellen Eisenberg, Willamette University, “When History Collides with the Present: Tales from the 21st Century Classroom”

February 9, 2021 | 7:00 PM

ZOOM Meeting – requires registration

Global pandemic, economic crisis, rising extremism, protest in the streets, insurrection, contested elections, racialized violence, impeachment. In my 30+ year teaching career, I’ve dealt with all of these topics–as history. Yet over the past several years–and particularly over the past year, I find myself teaching these histories in the classroom just as new incarnations of these events play out across the country (and, in some cases, right outside our classroom window). In this talk, I’ll reflect on the ways in which the history I teach has collided with our present moment. How does the immediacy of these events impact our experience in the classroom? How do student experiences of–and concerns about–their present world affect their engagement with the past?

About the Speaker:

Ellen Eisenberg

Ellen Eisenberg is the Dwight and Margaret Lear Professor of American History at Willamette University, where she has taught since 1990. She teaches courses on American history since Reconstruction, immigration and ethnic history, African American history, American Jewish history, and a research seminar called History in the Archives.

Her published work includes five monographs and a number of articles, focusing on history of Jews in the American West and their relationships with other ethnic/racial minorities. She is currently editing an anthology on that topic, to be published by Brandeis University Press next year. Her two volume history of Jews in Oregon, titled Embracing a Western Identity: Jewish Oregonians, 1849-1950 and The Jewish Oregon Story1950-2015, was published in 2015 and 2016.

#salemor keizer naacp and CC:M presents a free documentary and panel discussion – mon. jan. 18th

Viewing of the documentary:

THE WITNESS: FROM THE BALCONY OF ROOM 306

(2008) Documentary, Director: Adam Pertofsky [32 minutes]

Monday, January 18, 2021 | 12:00 PM and 6:00 PM

Viewed on Community Access Channel 21

After viewing the film there will be a panel discussion moderated by Salem-Keizer NAACP.

On April 4,1968, the Revered Samuel “Billy” Kyles stood beside Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee and bore witness to his brutal assassination. (Source: IMDB)

Willamette Heritage Center brings you “Zooming Back to History: An Online History Speaker Series” – tues. Dec. 15th

Willamette Heritage Center presents “Zooming Back to History – An Online History Speaker Series”:

“Smallpox Eradication: Inspiration, Warnings, and Lessons for COVID-19”

with Bob Reinhardt, Boise State University

Tuesday, December 15, 2020 | 7:00 PM

via Zoom

This series, a fundraiser for the Willamette Heritage Center, is brought to you by our generous sponsors, ATRIO Health Care, Becky & Jim Sterup, and Dorald Stoltz. This public online gathering seeks to share historical perspectives of topics related to the Mid-Willamette Valley and beyond. Starting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday night (see the dates below), each speaker will talk about their topic for approximately 30 minutes at which point we will ask participants to submit questions regarding the topic. Pay online – $10/speaker or $30/series. The link and password for each speaker will be sent to you via email.

This topic is based on The End of a Global Pox: America and the Eradication of Smallpox in the Cold War Era (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). Description of the book has been reproduced below:

By the mid-twentieth century, smallpox had vanished from North America and Europe but continued to persist throughout Africa, Asia, and South America. In 1965, the United States joined an international effort to eradicate the disease, and after fifteen years of steady progress, the effort succeeded. Bob H. Reinhardt demonstrates that the fight against smallpox drew American liberals into new and complex relationships in the global Cold War, as he narrates the history of the only cooperative international effort to successfully eliminate a human disease.

Unlike other works that have chronicled the fight against smallpox by offering a “biography” of the disease or employing a triumphalist narrative of a public health victory, The End of a Global Pox examines the eradication program as a complex exercise of American power. Reinhardt draws on methods from environmental, medical, and political history to interpret the global eradication effort as an extension of U.S. technological, medical, and political power. This book demonstrates the far-reaching manifestations of American liberalism and Cold War ideology and sheds new light on the history of global public health and development.

About the Speaker:

Bob H. Reinhardt is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Boise State University, where he works in the fields of environmental history, public history, the history of the American West, and the history of public health. His most recent book is Struggle on the North Santiam: Power and Community on the Margins of the American West (Oregon State University Press, 2020), a detailed interpretive history of a group of Oregon communities that have sought to transition their economies from natural-resource extraction to natural-resource-based recreational tourism. Bob’s current project is The Atlas of Drowned Towns, a comprehensive public history project exploring the lost histories of communities that were inundated, displaced, and disappeared by river development projects in the American West. He is also the author of The End of a Global Pox: America and the Eradication of Smallpox in the Cold War Era (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). Bob directs the internship program for Boise State’s Department of History, and he is the founder and director of Boise State’s Working History Center, which seeks to advocate for and demonstrate the vitality and relevance of history. His professional experience includes serving as the Executive Director of the Willamette Heritage Center, a postdoctoral fellowship at Carnegie Mellon University, and teaching positions at Western Oregon University and Willamette University.

Zoom Back to History website and link to pay online.

Willamette University and WU Hallie Ford Museum of Art Present the “The Forgotten Man” Film Series

“The Forgotten Man,” 1932–1940:  Four American Movies from the Decade of the Great Depression

A self-guided film series to accompany the Forgotten Stories exhibition

This film series has been curated by Robert Bibler

Hallie Ford Director, John Olbrantz of the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, asked Rob Bibler to create a film series to accompany their exhibition of art generated by FDR’s New Deal programs, Forgotten Stories: Northwest Public Art in the 1930s.  That exhibition opening is delayed, but the film series attached to the exhibition is available now (link below).

Rob Bibler: In consultation with Director Olbrantz, I set this film series up as a self-guided streaming series, providing the Depression-era movie selections, film stills, the introduction and film descriptions, plus streaming options for each movie.  

I wrote program essays for two of the four movies, The Grapes of Wrath and My Man Godfrey.  Andrea Foust at the Museum did a great job designing the site and creating helpful live links for the films’ streaming options and for certain references in my text.

How to watch: Click on the link below. Scroll down for the 4 movies and streaming option links. Some are free; some you may already have a subscription for; some may cost a little. There are program notes for the first two movies: The Grapes of Wrath and My Man Godfrey.

Here is the link to “The Forgotten Man,” 1932–1940:  Four American Movies from the Decade of the Great Depression.

The Hallie Ford exhibition opening has been delayed as the museum is temporarily closed till further notice. Due to COVID-19 exhibition dates may change. Currently, Holiday Closure: Dec. 14 – Jan. 3

Willamette Heritage Center presents: Zooming Back to History, An Online History Speaker Series – Tues. Nov. 17th

Zooming Back to History: An Online History Speaker Series

A New Look at Jason Lee with Dr. Jennifer Jopp

Tuesday, November 17, 2020 | 7:00 PM

Via Zoom – Donations appreciated

We are accustomed to think of Jason Lee as solitary figure, one fueled by the desire to convert the indigenous peoples to Christianity. Yet, his arrival in the territory cannot be understood outside the relationships with indigenous peoples in the area, the colonial conflict with Great Britain for supremacy in the region, the conflict with other religious denominations in the area, and the conflict with others over access to land.

Lee, sent by the Methodists to the territory, was instrumental in the construction of a Manual Labor Training School for indigenous youth. When that project failed, the newly-imagined school for the children of the white missionaries took over the building.

This lecture re-examines the life of Lee and seeks, by placing Lee into this broader colonial context, to understand how we have come to see Lee- who largely failed at his ventures and was recalled in disgrace-as we do. It seeks, too, to understand what aspects of our history we elide when we focus on the life of one white man.

Starting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday night (see the dates below), each speaker will talk about their topic for approximately 30 minutes at which point we will ask participants to submit questions regarding the topic.

More information and payment links – $10/speaker or $30/series. The link and password for each speaker will be sent to you via email.

About the Speaker: 

Dr. Jennifer Jopp

Dr. Jennifer Jopp is a Senior Lecturer in History at Willamette University, where she has taught for 30 years. Her work on Jason Lee is part of a research project undertaken with a colleague and four students on the early history of Willamette. She teaches courses in early American and colonial Latin American history, as well as American Legal History.

December 15: Bob Reinhardt, Smallpox Eradication

This series, a fundraiser for the Willamette Heritage Center, is brought to you by our generous sponsors, ATRIO Health Care, Becky & Jim Sterup, and Dorald Stoltz. This public online gathering seeks to share historical perspectives of topics related to the Mid-Willamette Valley and beyond.

#SalemOR Annual Peace Lecture Goes Online: “Unfinished Democracy: Making Good Trouble for Racial Equity” – Wed. Nov. 18th

31st Annual Salem Peace Lecture:

UNFINISHED DEMOCRACY: MAKING GOOD TROUBLE FOR RACIAL EQUITY

Speaker: Rev. Dr. Emma Jordan-Simpson

Wednesday, November 18, 2020 | 6:30 PM

Via Zoom

This year’s Salem Peace Lecture will be held online due to COVID 19.

Dr. Emma Jordan-Simpson is the 26th Executive Director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation USA, the oldest peace and justice organization in North America. Under Rev. Jordan-Simpson’s leadership, FOR USA is adopting a reparative lens to pursue justice and racial reconciliation in the United States.

Ordained by the Concord Baptist Church of Christ in 1989, her leadership among New York’s advocates and organizers has centered on advocacy for children. As Executive Director of the Children’s Defense Fund – New York, she worked with advocates to name and address New York’s cradle to prison pipeline crisis; prioritize youth justice within New York’s diverse faith communities; and close abusive youth prisons redirecting resources to invest in youth and their communities.

Rev. Jordan-Simpson is a graduate of Fisk University, Union Theological Seminary, and Drew Theological Seminary.

Each year the Salem Peace Lecture Committee honors a Peacemaker of the Year during the Lecture. This year’s honoree will be former Salem Mayor and lifelong human rights activist Mike Swaim. You will not want to miss this, so mark your calendar now.

All you need to attend the Salem Peace Lecture is this link: https://willametteuniversity.zoom.us/s/91781219328

Please feel free to share it widely.

There is never a charge for the Peace Lecture, but if you can, please donate to support the 2020 Salem Peace Lecture.

To view the Facebook Event for the Salem Peace Lecture, click here.

For additional information, please contact Karen Wood of the Willamette University Office of the Chaplains, (503) 370-6213.

Drive-Thru Trick-Or-Treat! At Willamette Heritage Center in #SalemOR – Sat. Oct. 31st

Willamette Heritage Center presents:

Drive-Thru Trick-Or-Treat!

Saturday, October 31st, 2020 | 12:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Robots, super heroes, and princesses unite!

Free for families!

Looking for a fun, safe, socially-distanced way for your family to enjoy trick-or-treating?

Give your little ones some normal this year with drive-thru trick-or-treating at the Willamette Heritage Center.

From noon to 5pm, you can drive through our parking lot where the “Candy Crew” — local businesses, non-profits, and individuals — will pass out candy with 6′ poles. Pack the kids, in their costumes, into the passenger side of your vehicle. That’s the side the candy will be on! Head into the parking lot from 14th Street, just north of Mill Street and follow the one-way path.

This free event is first come, first served. No registration necessary. We look forward to seeing your costumes!

Please note: This event is drive-thru only, no trick-or-treaters or members of our “Candy Crew” will be able to walk on the site to help maintain COVID-19 safety protocols. Masks must be worn at all times. “Candy Crew” will be given gloves for distributing candy.

If you are interested in being part of our “Candy Crew” as a business, non-profit, or individual, please email Michelle Cordova, Executive Director, at michellec@willametteheritage.org.

This event is free thanks to our generous sponsors!

Salem is getting ready to hire a new police chief

Ask a Question of the Candidates

Deadline: Thursday, October 29, 2020| 1:00 PM

Three review committees made up of community members, area law enforcement officials, and City department directors screened and interviewed a diverse group of applicants. The committee made their final recommendation to the City Manager this week.

Both candidates will be invited to an all-day interview process consisting of a virtual community forum where finalists will answer questions from community members and city staff. There will also be several opportunities for the Mayor and City Council members (including yours truly) to interact with both candidates by way of virtual interviews and socially distanced panel discussions. All public portions of the interview will be live streamed to YouTube on October 30, 2020.

If you would like to submit a question for the candidates, please complete the following form no later than 1 p.m., Thursday, October 29. Please note, that program time may not allow for all questions to be asked.

About the Candidates:

Malik Aziz, Dallas, TX

Malik Aziz is a Major with the Dallas, Texas Police Department, having served with the agency since 1992. His specialties after nearly 30 years in law enforcement include law enforcement analysis, nonprofit leadership, budgeting, policy analysis, event planning, and government. His previous assignments in the department include Commanding Patrol, Special Operations, SWAT, Traffic, Investigations, and Support Services. He is currently leading night command for the northwest and north-central area of Dallas.

Major Malik Aziz earned his Bachelor of Arts in Criminology and Criminal Justice from The University of Texas at Arlington attended the FBI National Academy and earned his Master of Business Administration (MBA) with a specialization in non-profit and organizational management from The University of Dallas. He currently serves as the Chairman of the Dallas Police Museum and is the former National Chair and Executive Director of the National Black Police Association. Other highlights of his career include serving as a Master Peace Officer, cultural awareness Instructor, Islam and Middle Eastern instructor, crime prevention specialist, ethics and diversity trainer, incident command system trainer, and chemical agent instructor. He has over 20 career commendations and skilled in basic and intermediate Arabic.

Trevor Womack, Stockton, CA

Deputy Chief Trevor Womack joined the Stockton, California Police Department in 1992.
As Deputy Chief, he led the Logistics Bureau for one year, which included the Administrative and Technical Services Divisions, then assumed his current position heading the Operations Bureau. He is the second-in-command and responsible for two-thirds of the department’s staff and budget, including the Field Operations Division (Patrol), Special Operations Division, and Investigations Division – along with more than 30 specialty programs such as Air Support, Canine, Crisis Intervention Team, Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD), and the Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team. Deputy Chief Womack also has significant experience managing and investigating critical incidents; implementing new technologies; recruiting, training, and hiring.

Deputy Chief Womack earned his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice from California State University Stanislaus, attended the FBI National Academy, and completed the California Peace Officer Standards and Training Executive Development Course. He earned his Master of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense) from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California.

https://form.cityofsalem.net/s3/Ask-a-Question-of-Police-Chief-Candidates

#SalemOR City Club Candidates for Oregon Senate District 10 Part of Salem City Club’s 2020 Informed Voter Series Friday, October 2

Celebrating over 50 Years of exceptional civic discourse
September 26, 2020 Volume 53, Issue 2

Candidates for Oregon
Senate District 10

Part of Salem City Club’s 2020 Informed Voter Series

Friday, October 2, 2020 | 12:00 PM (Noon program)

via Zoom Webinar

The second program of the 2020 Informed Voter Series will be a debate amongst the 3 candidates running to represent Oregon Senate District 10. As you may well remember, there was a hard fought and close race for this position in 2016 between incumbent Jackie Winters and Reverend Deb Patterson. Deb is now coming back for another run at the seat. Incumbent Senator Denyc Boles was appointed to this position and is now running for the first time. Finally, Taylor Rickey is a political newcomer who hopes that he has what the district voters are looking for.

Denyc Boles (Republican) served as the State Representative in House District 19 until her appointment as Senator of Senate District 10 last year. She is a lifelong resident of the Willamette Valley. Over the years, she has owned and operated several small businesses, served as staff in the Oregon legislature, and currently works in community relations for Salem Health. Ms Boles has also been active in her community, including interacting with the Boys and Girls Club and Greater Salem Young Life, and serving on the Marion County Budget Committee. As Senator, she serves on multiple committees including the Full Ways and Means, Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Mental Health, and Vice-Chair of the Senate Committee on Housing and Development. More information on Boles’ campaign website.

Rev. Dr. Deborah L. Patterson (Democrat) is an ordained Congregational minister and currently serves at at the 129-year old rural Congregational Church in Canby. She holds master’s degrees in music and health administration. In addition, she has a doctorate degree from Eden Theological Seminary. Deb has a 20 year history of advocating and working for improved healthcare and education, both internationally and in the US. She is currently Chair of the Marion Council Health Advisory Board and serves on the Marion County Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Committee. Recently Gov Brown appointed her to serve on the Oregon Disabilities Commission and the Oregon Nursing Home Administrators Board. More information on Patterson’s campaign website.

Taylor Rickey (Libertarian) is seeking office for the first time. As a Libertarian, he believes in limited government and maximum freedom. His policy issues include criminal justice reform, reducing taxes, and bridging the divide caused by Republicans and Democrats that “have torn our communities apart”. Rickey attended Woodburn High School. Currently, he is a stay at home dad to his 5 year old son. He says that his family “gave me their full support and encouragement when I decided to run for office”. More information on Rickey’s campaign website.

Quick, helpful links to stuff going on in Salem, Oregon.